5 albums of 1981 that defined the punk

0


To early 80’s, punk rock had already transcended to the streets of London and New York, and had spread to the rest of the world. In 1981, his sound had been mixed with the currents even more noisy as the hardcore. We review in this note some discs that came out during that year and give an account of the fusion between the two styles.

This selection of albums was originally released by journalist Tim Stegall in Alternative Press and also includes license plates as Hardcore ’81 D. O. A., A Minute To Pray, A Second To Die of The Flesh Eaters, the disk homónino of Adolescents, Talk Talk Talk The Psychedelic furs is a must, The Punch Line of Minutemen, among others. You can review the full list in this link.

Black Flag – Damaged

1981 – SST

The debut album of this band that by then had already changed three times a vocalist on their first three EPs. His proposal was to sound more angry than the punk of 1977. When he took over as singer Henry Rollins, knew how to transmit with power the message of anti-authoritarian, full of neurosis, loneliness, and criticism of the social inequality of the songs of the group.

The Replacements – Sorry Ma, Forgot To Take Out The Trash

1981 – Twin/Tone

Unlike his friends and rivals Hüsker Dü, who achieved the global success that year, The Replacements delivered tracks traitors and desfachatados. Paul Westerberg has left his acid humor in the lyrics with phrases like “you Are in love and I’m in trouble.” That sincerity became a training of worship to our days.

The Cramps – Psychedelic Jungle

1981 – I. R. S.

Brian Tristan (also known as Kid Congo Powers) came in replacement of Bryan Gregory (known as the guitarist macabre) and The Cramps delivered an album that continued his tradition of punkabilly and emparentaba with the psychedelic garage rock of the 60’s. Songs as insane as a “Green Fuz”, “Can t Find My Mind” and “Beautiful Gardens” give an account of the success of this foray wild.

The Gun Club – Fire Of Love

1981 – Ruby Records

Jeffrey Lee Pierce, editor of the journal Slash, and president of the club of fans of Blondie teamed musically with Brian Tristan (also a member of The Cramps), president of the fan club of the Ramones in 1979. Both craron Creeping Ritual, a project that later came to be called The Gun Club. In this album, they mixed without restrictions, country music, blues and punk three chords. Following the departure of Tristan, Ward Dotson replaced him, and played guitar on tracks bohemians like “Sex Beat” and “She’s Like Heroin To Me”.

X – Wild Gift

1981 – Slash

The second studio album of this band from california came to rankearse in the position 333 of the list of 500 best albums of all time published by Rolling Stone magazine. In addition, his song “White Girl” was sampled by the Red Hot Chili Peppers in their song “Good Time Boys”, published in 1989. There is No doubt that this plate was a masterpiece of John Doe and Exene Cervenka, who had just married and were finding the way of living a free love.


In this difficult time, we need your help

In a time that is so critical for the independent media, we don’t want to stop spreading the culture. That’s why you need it more than ever: your input is crucial for the sustainability of Indie Today.

Join the Community