Lost in her | Cines Argentinos

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Note of Matías Lértora

Can a film have a dialogue with another? That is, that their stories are connected. The answer is obvious if it is a sequel, prequel, and/or franchise. But what about films that function as separate entities and on top of different authors? Because there are some cases, but one particular of the recent history of the cinema that to me fascinates me. Lost in translation (Lost in Tokyo, 2003) and Her (Her, 2013) communicating as few films have done.

Lost in traslation

It is said that the screenwriter and director Sofia Coppola was inspired by his personal history and on a trip to Japan of his youth when he accompanied his father (award-winning director Francis Ford Coppola), who had to burn a advertising.
The film speaks of loneliness, of trying to find yourself. The meaning of the couple, of how we see, how we can be ignored by our most intimate friends, among other things.
But above all speaks of be found when you’re lost. For this purpose, he used to Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson) and Bob (Bill Murray), two people in the states are totally different from their lives, but with too much in common.
They are alone and are in a city where everything is big, bright and rare. With a culture that echoes with their feelings.
Coppola won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for this film.

Her

It is said that the screenwriter and director Spike Jonze was inspired by his personal history to make it.
The film talks about life post separation of a couple, from the point of view of the main character. Showing through flashbacks as the link was worn and breaking.
The framework for this story is a near future in which people can not only interact with Artificial Intelligences but also have affective relations with them and even fall in love.
It is as well as Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) lives a passionate romance with Samantha (Scarlett Johansson) as viewers we are presented with a lot of questions and conjectures about the relationships of others as their own.
The film opens and ends with Theodore writing a letter. First a celebration of love and then a break. Jonze won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for this film.

Connection

Then, in addition to sharing the actress, what is it that unites these two films?
It turns out that Sofia Coppola and Spike Jonze were a couple for several years and were separated for the premiere of Lost in translation.
Taking this information into account, the viewings subsequent two films change.
If we stop in the movie that takes place in Japan and knowing that the loving relationship of the author was in his final moments, we give another meaning and depth to what happens to Charlotte and what that says Bob.
The silences, the contemplations, and even the mythical end where the viewer can’t hear what they are saying to the protagonists.
Ten years later, Jonze answers this with a very clear perspective, with an analysis, a quasi-therapeutic to the reversion of a relationship that was breaking apart little by little by not being on the same page.
Theodore is unable to have a new relationship, even sabotage. Newly can be opened and re-exploit their feelings with Samantha, someone who doesn’t have a body, it is only a voice.
Also, when he speaks of his ex (Rooney Mara with a look very similar to Coppola) he does so with admiration, described as successful and that his work makes him cry.
The scene in which they sign the divorce papers is key. Jonze and Coppola were married for four years.
In addition to the argument and interpretation, both films “are espejan” from the sunset and photograph.
We have long sequences of contemplative where the characters observe skyscrapers from the heights. Tokyo, on the one hand, and Los Angeles futuristic (which is in fact Shanghai), on the other.
Scenes on a train, in a bed, in an elevator, and most details are repeated in both films.

The love, the heartbreak, the breakup, the longing, the things that were said and, above all, those that are silent are the bridge of ten years that bind these two films.
A couple who is already not what it was, and that through a great art exhibition succeeded in another type of connection, so that we can have our own experiences.

Matías Lértora