J. K. Rowling announces new book for ‘children confined’ – Music and Books – Culture

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The author, british J. K. Rowling, author of the successful saga of Harry Potter, announced Tuesday that it will publish free of charge on-line and deliveries, a novel written ten years ago to entertain the “children confined”.

Since Tuesday and until the 10th of June, will be aired each day on a website devoted to it one or more of the 34 chapters of ‘The Ickabog’, a story which owes its title to the character of fantasy that it portrays.

Is the “eternal,” “truth and the abuse of power”, according to its author.

“Written to be read aloud, ‘The Ickabog’ is a fairy tale set in an imaginary country, and has nothing to do with the rest of the work of J. K. Rowling”, says in a press release, ensuring that the story is addressed to the “children 7 to 9 years, but can be enjoyed by the whole family.”

(It may be of interest: all the news about Harry Potter)The author had written over ten years ago to read it to their own children before they sleep: “The idea of ‘The Ickabog’ came to me when I was still writing ‘Harry Potter’, I wanted to publish it after,” explained the writer in your web page.

But the novelist british finally decided to move away from the children’s literature for a while, leaving the draft gathering dust “in the attic for a decade”.

However, “at a dinner a few weeks ago, I posed the idea of lowering it in the attic and publish it for free for the children confined”explains. Convinced by the “enthusiasm and moving” of their children are now teenagers, the author decided to put it at the disposal of “the children confined who need a distraction during this strange and difficult period we are going through”.

Several translations will also be available “shortly”, according to the release. From November, the story will be available in format printed book, audio book or ebook. According to the statement, the benefits of these sales will be donated in their entirety to the “projects of assistance to groups particularly affected by the pandemic.”

AFP