Afghan stray NGOs try to get dogs and cats out of the country before the Aug 31 deadline | World

Two non-governmental organizations in Kabul, Afghanistan, are trying to raise money and find a way to remove hundreds of cats and dogs from the country by Aug. 31, the deadline set by the Taliban for the withdrawal of soldiers from the United States and other countries who formed a military coalition that had been in the country for 20 years.

The NGO, Kabul Small Animal Rescue, is trying to raise $1.5 million to get its employees and about 200 dogs and cats out of Afghanistan, according to a report by National Public Radio, in the United States.

VIDEO: Satellite images show long lines at the entrance to Kabul airport

VIDEO: Satellite images show long lines at the entrance to Kabul airport

The organization has a director in the US, Charlotte Maxwell-Jones, who says she doesn’t know if it will be possible to leave the country after August 31st.

Undated image of some of the animals from Kabul Small Animal Rescue posted on the group’s social network profile — Photo: Reproduction/Facebook

They still need boxes to take 120 dogs and 100 cats and, in addition, visas and permits to be able to take the animals to another country.

Maxwell-Jones stated that they had already raised US$ 700 thousand (R$ 3.7 million, at the current price) until Tuesday (24).

VIDEO: Three Brazilians ask for help to leave Afghanistan with their families, says Brazilian ambassador to Pakistan

VIDEO: Three Brazilians ask for help to leave Afghanistan with their families, says Brazilian ambassador to Pakistan

Prices for travel, however, are getting higher. She claimed that a cargo plane flight to Jordan cost US$300,000 (R$1.6 million) a few days ago, but today it is quoted at US$800,000 (R$4.2 million).

Another organization, the Nowzad Shelter, is also rushing to evacuate its staff and the animals in their care in Afghanistan.

The organization is by a former British Army soldier, Paul Farthing.

Farthing even complained about UK Defense Minister Ben Wallace. The minister said that the former soldier and employees are free to enter the airport and board a British Air Force plane, but without the animals. There are 68 employees.

On Tuesday, Nowzad supporters said they had raised enough money to charter a flight.

The problem, according to Wallace, is getting people safely to the airport, and that there are thousands of people in Kabul who are the priority to be taken by planes.

Farthing had said that the animals would go in the luggage compartment, and that the free seats could be filled by other people who also had authorization for the trip.

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