Japanese princess gives up 6.7 million reais royalty bag to marry college boyfriend – Monet

Princess Mako at Tokyo Imperial Palace event (Photo: Getty Images)

Princess Mako at Tokyo Imperial Palace event (Photo: Getty Images)

Princess Mako of Japan, 29 years old, gave up a royal tradition and abdicated a payment of US$1.3 million (approximately R$6.7 million) to which she was entitled to continue her wedding plans. with her college boyfriend, Kei Komuro. The exchange of alliances between Emperor Naruhito’s niece and her current fiancé is scheduled for the end of 2021.

According to British newspaper The Times, the sum of US$1.3 million is paid by the Japanese government to all women in the local royal family who lose their status when they marry a non-royal citizen. However, Mako waived the amount.

Prince Fumihito with daughter Princess Mako at an event in Japan (Photo: Getty Images)

Prince Fumihito with daughter Princess Mako at an event in Japan (Photo: Getty Images)

According to international press reports, the wedding of Mako and Komuro at the end of 2021 will consist of a simple ceremony, attended only by close friends and family. They later plan to move to the United States, where the princess will begin her work at a New York law firm.

Mako and Komuro met while attending the International Christian University in Tokyo. They were introduced by mutual friends during a get-together dinner among students in the traditional and trendy Shibuya district of the Japanese capital. The two started dating and became engaged in December 2013.

Princess Mako at Tokyo Imperial Palace event (Photo: Getty Images)

Princess Mako at Tokyo Imperial Palace event (Photo: Getty Images)

Mako maintained a long-distance relationship during his time living in London, studying Art Museum and Gallery Studies at Leicester University. The two had plans to exchange alliances in November 2018, but postponed it. Mako attributed the delay to her and her fiance’s “immaturity”.

Mako’s father, Prince Akishino, is first in line to the Japanese throne. Japanese tradition only allows men among the occupants of the local throne. Thus, without male heirs, Emperor Naruhito must be succeeded by his brother when he dies.

Princess Amalia, from the Netherlands, in an essay done in one of the gardens of the Huis ten Bosch Palace (Photo: Getty Images)

Princess Amalia, from the Netherlands, in an essay done in one of the gardens of the Huis ten Bosch Palace (Photo: Getty Images)

Mako’s renouncement of its US$ 1.3 million value comes just months after the Dutch princess Amalia, heir to the local throne, renounced the “royalty grant” to which she would have been entitled between the beginning and the end of her university studies. She could receive an annual sum of 1.6 million euros (R$9.9 million) between her 18th birthday and the end of her college education.

However, Amalia released an open letter to the Dutch Prime Minister, Mark Ruttle, informing him that he will return to the public coffers any amount deposited in his account during his time as a university student.

King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands with his Argentine wife, Queen Maxima, and daughters: Amalia, Alexia and Ariane (Photo: Getty Images)

King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands with his Argentine wife, Queen Maxima, and daughters: Amalia, Alexia and Ariane (Photo: Getty Images)