Without Citing Bolsonaro, Pacheco Makes Video Statement Criticizing ‘Undemocratic Robbery’ | Policy

The president of the Senate, Rodrigo Pacheco (DEM-MG), declared this Wednesday (8) that there is a “real crisis” in the country, and that the solution to problems such as hunger and poverty “is not in authoritarianism, no it is in anti-democratic raptures, it is not in questioning democracy.”

It was Pacheco’s first public statement after President Jair Bolsonaro’s speech with coup threats and anti-democratic speeches during September 7 demonstrations in Brasília and São Paulo on Tuesday.

“[Há] A real crisis of hunger and poverty that knocks at the door of Brazilians, sacrificing people’s dignity. Inflation, with the loss of Brazilian purchasing power, things are more expensive. The unemployment crisis, the energy crisis, the water crisis. A pandemic that saddened the country a lot,” listed Pacheco.

“So, a real crisis that we are experiencing and that we have to solve. This solution is not in authoritarianism. It is not in anti-democratic raptures, it is not in questioning democracy. This solution is in the political maturity of the constituted powers. to understand, to seek convergences for what truly interests Brazilians,” he continued (read in full below).

The president of the Senate, however, did not speak directly about the agenda of the acts, nor about Bolsonaro’s speeches – which included, for example, the threat of disrespecting the decisions of the Federal Supreme Court (STF) minister Alexandre de Moraes and accusations, without evidence, about the electoral system.

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In the recorded speech, Pacheco once again called for dialogue and harmony between the Executive, Legislative and Judiciary.

“May the powers sit at the table, that the powers organize themselves, respect each other, each one fulfills its role respecting the role of the other, and seek a harmony that will mean solving people’s problems,” he said.

Rodrigo Pacheco also declared that the problems of Brazilians will not be solved with excesses, radicalism and extremism. “It is with dialogue and respect for the Constitution that we are going to be able to resolve the problems of Brazilians,” said the president of the Senate.

Jurists see liability crime in Bolsonaro speech

Jurists see liability crime in Bolsonaro speech

The Senate even canceled the deliberative sessions and committee meetings that were scheduled for this Wednesday and Thursday. The reason was not given.

“The Presidency informs the Senators and Senators that remote deliberative sessions and committee meetings scheduled for September 8 and 9 have been cancelled,” Pacheco said in a message to lawmakers.

Also on Tuesday, while the September 7 demonstrations were taking place in the largest cities in the country, Pacheco posted a message about the date on a social network. In the text, he again defended the “absolute defense of the democratic rule of law”.

“At the time when Independence Day is celebrated, a strong expression of national freedom, let us not fail to understand our most evident dependence on something that should unite Brazil: the absolute defense of the Democratic State of Law”, he published.

Read below the full statement released by Rodrigo Pacheco:

On this 7th of September, many Brazilians took to the streets. Thousands more were not, and there is a common point among all Brazilians. We live in a country in crisis.

A real crisis of hunger and poverty that knocks at the door of Brazilians, sacrificing people’s dignity. Inflation, with the loss of Brazilian purchasing power, things are more expensive. The unemployment crisis, the energy crisis, the water crisis. A pandemic that greatly saddened the country.

So, a real crisis that we are experiencing and that we have to solve.

This solution does not lie in authoritarianism. It is not about undemocratic raptures, it is not about questioning democracy.

This solution lies in the political maturity of the constituted powers to understand each other, to seek convergences for what truly interests Brazilians.

That’s why it’s fundamental and we must work hard because the powers sit at the table, organize themselves, respect each other. Each one fulfills its role respecting the role of the other and seeks a harmony that will mean solving people’s problems.

I repeat, it’s not with excesses, it’s not with radicalism, it’s not with extremism. It is with dialogue and respect for the constitution that we will be able to resolve the problems of Brazilians.

That’s what Brazilians expect from Brasília and from the powers that be.