UN accuses Taliban of killing 4 in peaceful protest in Afghanistan | World

“We call on the Taliban to immediately stop using force and arbitrary arrests against those who exercise their right to peacefully protest and against journalists covering these demonstrations,” said a spokesman for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Protests, especially those led by women, represent a challenge for the new government of the Taliban, which is trying to convey an image of greater restraint to the West (despite the reality that confronts the extremist group’s discourse).

Afghan women protest in the capital Kabul on September 7, 2021 — Photo: Hoshang Hashimi/AFP

Shamdasani Ravine also said that the extremist group has banned any unauthorized concentration in the country since Wednesday (8) and has asked the new government to respect international humanitarian law.

“Any use of force must be a last resort in response to the demonstrations and must be strictly necessary and proportionate,” the UN spokeswoman said. “Firearms should never be used unless they are in response to an imminent deadly threat.”

The Taliban is also accused of assaulting and arresting journalists covering the same demonstration on Tuesday (7). Taqi Daryabi and Neamat Naghdi were left with injuries to the back, legs, shoulder and arm, as well as bruises and cuts on their faces (see the video below).

Afghan journalists beaten by the Taliban talk about the hours of terror they lived

Afghan journalists beaten by the Taliban talk about the hours of terror they lived

Three days earlier, on Saturday (4), another protest by women was repressed with tear gas and pepper spray.

On August 18, three days after the Taliban seized the capital Kabul and returned to power after 20 years, at least three people were killed after extremists cracked down on a protest in Jalalabad (see the video below).

“In addition to banning peaceful demonstrations, the Taliban should stop using force and guarantee the right to peaceful assembly and freedom of expression,” Shamdasani said. “The bans on any peaceful concentration represent a violation of international law.”

VIDEO: Taliban suppressed protest ends with killings in Jalalabad

VIDEO: Taliban suppressed protest ends with killings in Jalalabad

When the Taliban first took power between 1996 and 2001, women’s rights were brutally suspended and they were prevented from working and studying. (see the video below).

In season, extremists have adopted an extremely strict view of Islamic law. sharia), which included stonings, amputations and even public executions.

Afghan women could only leave the house with a male family member and were required to wear burqas that covered their entire body.

Afghanistan: Understand the risks for women under the Taliban regime

Afghanistan: Understand the risks for women under the Taliban regime

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