Fontana di Trevi hides underground archaeological site; meet

The Fontana di Trevi, one of Rome’s landmarks, hides an archaeological site in its basement which, like the city’s famous set of catacombs, dates back to the Roman Empire and early Christianity.

Called Vicus Caprarius, or “City of Water”, the ancient Roman aristocracy’s system of aqueducts and apartments is spread throughout the Trevi district. Built in the first century after Christ, it was only discovered in the late 1990s.

Vicus Caprarius, archaeological site under the Trevi Fountain (1) - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius

The Fontana di Trevi, in Rome, on the site where the Vicus Caprarius is located

Image: Disclosure/Vicus Caprarius

Opened last Friday (10) for visitation as “Trevi’s underground museum”, it offers the possibility to see up close hundreds of period artifacts found during excavations, such as tiles and mosaics, statues, ceramics and more than 800 coins — objects that are linked to important events like the famous fire during the years of Emperor Nero.

Vicus Caprarius, archaeological site under the Trevi Fountain (2) - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius
Image: Disclosure/Vicus Caprarius

Vicus Caprarius, archaeological site under the Trevi Fountain (3) - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius
Image: Disclosure/Vicus Caprarius

Aqua Virgo, one of the eleven aqueducts of ancient Rome, is still in operation under the fountain — it is precisely this construction that ‘feeds’ it — and, therefore, it is also possible to visit the complex’s underground swimming pools.

Vicus Caprarius, archaeological site under the Trevi Fountain (4) - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius
Image: Disclosure/Vicus Caprarius

Vicus Caprarius, archaeological site under the Trevi Fountain (5) - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius
Image: Disclosure/Vicus Caprarius

Prices to get to know Vicus Caprarius vary from one to four euros, that is, from R$ 6.20 to R$ 24.80, on average, according to today’s quotation. Access to this treasure of the history of the Italian capital, however, is not so simple for those who do not like closed, dark and, above all, difficult to explore places in times of pandemic.

Vicus Caprarius, archaeological site under the Trevi Fountain (6) - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius
Image: Disclosure/Vicus Caprarius

Vicus Caprarius, archaeological site under the Trevi Fountain (7) - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius
Image: Disclosure/Vicus Caprarius

Vicus Caprarius, archaeological site under the Trevi Fountain (8) - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius - Press Release/Vicus Caprarius
Image: Disclosure/Vicus Caprarius

But it is possible to see a little of the area without leaving the house. Tourist guide Federica — who runs the Live Virtual Guide platform, where she makes live tours on demand for tourists “from a distance” in Rome — has created a virtual itinerary for anyone looking to discover the aqueducts and treasures hidden under one of the most famous fountains in Rome. world. Check out: