So would Brazilian cities with rising sea levels; check out



Climate Central researchers decided to simulate the practical impact of these changes on postcards in Brazil and the world.  Reproduction/Disclosure


© Reproduction/Disclosure
Climate Central researchers decided to simulate the practical impact of these changes on postcards in Brazil and the world. Reproduction/Disclosure

The impact of global warming will be increasingly felt in the coming decades. To demonstrate this in a practical way, Climate Central researchers decided to simulate the practical impact of these changes on the world’s postcards. Even if, under the Paris Agreement, global warming is limited to 1.5 °C from pre-industrial levels, sea levels will continue to rise.

The simulation shows how many places will be in 2050 if the global average temperature has reached a plateau 3 °C above the current level. The results are devastating. Most of these monuments, cities and sights – including in Brazil – will be under water.

The worst scenario, according to risk projections, would be in Asia. About half of the populations of Bangladesh and Vietnam would suffer from rising seas in the long term, even though global warming can reach up to 2°C. China, India and Indonesia would also face the same flooding problem. The main projections go to the end of this century, ranging from about half a meter to almost twice that.

If the planet reaches 3°C, Climate Central reports that about 43 million people in China will live on land projected to be below the high tide level by 2100, with 200 million people living in areas at risk of rising water levels. long-term sea.

According to the Climate Central report, some 385 million people currently live on land that will be flooded by high tide, even if greenhouse gas emissions are reduced.