New images reveal mysterious structures in the ‘heart of the Milky Way’ (PHOTOS)

https://br.sputniknews.com/20220127/novas-imagens-revelam-misteriosas-estruturas-no-coracao-da-via-lactea-fotos-21181563.html

New images reveal mysterious structures in the ‘heart of the Milky Way’ (PHOTOS)

New images reveal mysterious structures in the ‘heart of the Milky Way’ (PHOTOS)

Scientists used the MeerKAT radio telescope in South Africa to capture stunning images of our galaxy. 2022.01.27, Sputnik Brazil

2022-01-27T10:45-0300

2022-01-27T10:45-0300

2022-01-27T10:45-0300

society and everyday

space

radio telescope

Milky Way

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With the new data, astronomers were able to visualize that the Milky Way has nearly 1,000 strands of magnetic filaments that measure up to 150 light-years in length and are neatly positioned. The new study was published this week in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. . The discovery was celebrated by members of the scientific community on social media, such as former NASA astronomer and current Japanese Space Agency researcher James O’Donoghue. Newly released images of the center of our galaxy! You’re seeing radio emissions that escaped the central region of our galaxy, enabling us to see exploding stars, star birth, and all the chaos around the center of a supermassive black hole 4 million times more massive than the Sun! Since the discovery of magnetic filaments in 1980, scientists have not counted on there being so many. The calculations made so far pointed to a maximum of 100 magnetic filaments. Scientists said they still haven’t been able to fully understand what the filaments are, or what they are for, but they are confident that with these new images they are getting closer and closer to a large discovery about the origin and functioning of our galaxy. The image was constructed from a mosaic of 20 different observations using about 200 hours of recordings in the telescope and covering an area 30 times larger than the Moon. To arrive at the final image, more than 70 terabytes of data were analyzed on a supercomputer in Cape Town, South Africa. This study has been under way for three years, shortly after the South African radio telescope began operating. The MeerKAT telescope is equipped with 64 plates radio station and opened in 2018, after 10 years of studies and tests. The giant equipment is part of the South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO).

2022

Sputnik Brazil

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br_BR

Sputnik Brazil

[email protected]

+74956456601

MIA „Rosiya Segodnya“

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Sputnik Brazil

[email protected]

+74956456601

MIA „Rosiya Segodnya“

space, radio telescope, milky way

Scientists used the MeerKAT radio telescope in South Africa to capture stunning images of our galaxy.

With the new data, astronomers were able to visualize that the Milky Way has nearly 1,000 strands of magnetic filaments that measure up to 150 light-years in length and are neatly positioned.
The new study was published this week in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. The discovery was celebrated by members of the scientific community on social media, such as former NASA astronomer and current Japanese Space Agency researcher James O’Donoghue.

Newly released images of the center of our galaxy! You’re seeing radio emissions that escaped the central region of our galaxy, enabling us to see exploding stars, star birth, and all the chaos around the center of a supermassive black hole 4 million times more massive than the Sun!

Since the discovery of magnetic filaments in 1980, scientists have did not count on the existence of so many. The calculations made so far pointed to a maximum of 100 magnetic filaments.

“Now we finally get to see the big picture, a bird’s-eye view filled with an abundance of filaments. When looking at just a few filaments, it’s hard to come to any real conclusions about what they are and where they come from. watershed to deepen our understanding of these structures,” said astrophysicist Farhad Yusef-Zadeh, who initially discovered the filaments.

Scientists said they still haven’t fully understood what the filaments are, or what they are for, but they are confident that with these new images they are getting closer and closer to a major discovery about the origin and workings of our galaxy.

“If you were from another planet, for example, and you met a very tall person on Earth, you would assume that all people are tall. But if you do Statistics across a population of people, you can determine the average height. That’s exactly what we’re doing. We can find out the strength of the magnetic fields, their length, their orientation and the radiation spectrum,” explained Yusef-Zadeh.

The image was constructed from a mosaic of 20 different observations using about 200 hours of recordings in the telescope and covering an area 30 times that of the Moon. To get the final image, more than 70 terabytes of data were analyzed on a supercomputer in Cape Town, South Africa.

This study has been under way for three years, shortly after the South African radio telescope began to operate.

The MeerKAT telescope is equipped with 64 radio plates and was inaugurated in 2018 after 10 years of studies and tests. THE giant equipment is part of the South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO).

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