What end do the flowers that the population leaves in honor of the queen do? – 09/14/2022

Around the world, subjects or admirers of Elizabeth II have paid tribute to the Queen by depositing flowers, cards and souvenirs in front of embassies (overseas) or palace gardens (in the UK). Visually it is a beautiful image.

At the time of Princess Diana’s death, in London alone, an estimated sixty million flowers were left in makeshift memorials. The gates of Kensington Palace were inaccessible in the midst of a flowering sea that went down in history.

While exciting, there was a practical difficulty as a result. For example, when the hearse with the Princess’ coffin left Westminster Abbey onto the Spencer family estate, it had to stop several times to clear the way so it could actually pass. A little complicated.

There is still no official estimated number for the honors for Elizabeth II. There are those who are already comparing with Diana, pointing out that the volume deposited appears to be smaller, but the truth is also that it is more spread out.

Queen's Memorial - Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images - Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Around the world, subjects or admirers of Elizabeth II have paid tribute to the Queen by depositing flowers.

Image: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

All over the UK there are official places to place flowers, candles or gifts, but there are three notable addresses: Balmoral, Scotland, where the Queen died; Buckingham, London, where she lived most of the year, and Windsor, where she liked to stay and where she will be buried.

The tributes to Diana focused more on Kensington and Paris, making the total more visible.

Tribute to Princess Diana in 2017: 20 years after her death - Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images - Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images

Tribute to Princess Diana in 2017: 20 years after her death

Image: Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images

Without getting into the dispute, still, the problems are the same. Due to previous experience, the tributes are more organized.

For example, in London, flowers are requested to be placed in a specific place: Green Park. They also ask that, if possible, they be deposited without packaging.

Tribute to Elizabeth, who died aged 96 - Tristan Fewings/Getty Images - Tristan Fewings/Getty Images

Tribute to Elizabeth, who died aged 96

Image: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images

Police officer paying tribute to Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace - Carl Court/Getty Images - Carl Court/Getty Images

Police officer paying tribute in Buckingham

Image: Carl Court/Getty Images

Knowing that there are those who insist on leaving memories in front of the gates of Buckingham Palace, there is a notice that – in 12 hours – the flowers will be transferred to the park.

Just to give you an idea, anyone who wants to go to the place in person needs patience and breath: the line to lay flowers and posters at the palace gates in London exceeded an hour and a half of walking at the beginning of the week.

Memorial Elizabeth II Green Park - Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images - Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Elizabeth II Green Park Memorial

Image: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In Windsor, flowers can be placed on the Long Walk at Cambridge Gate, close to the city centre. Every night, the flowers have been taken inside the castle and placed on the grass on the south side of St. George’s Chapel, where the Queen will be buried, on the 19th of September. After that date, it is expected that within a week to 14 days, the tributes will be completely removed from park areas.

And what happens next with the flowers?

Eventually, they turn into fertilizer.

In 1997, when London was filled with tributes to Diana, voluntary organizations helped with the cleanup.

Flowers for the Queen near the gates of Buckingham Palace - Tristan Fewings/Getty Images - Tristan Fewings/Getty Images

Flowers to the Queen near the gates of Buckingham Palace

Image: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images

First they transported the still-living flowers to hospitals and nursing homes. Those that were already decomposing were used as fertilizer in Kensington Gardens.

In the case of Queen Elizabeth II, the floral tributes will have the same routine and fate. They will be removed from Green Park and taken to the nursery in Hyde Park, where packaging, cards and labels will be separated and whatever is plant-based will undergo an analysis.

Whatever is possible, will be sent to hospitals and nursing homes. What not, will be used for composting on shrubbery or landscaping projects in the city’s Royal Parks. The rule applies at all locations around the country.

Basically, there is the certainty that there is a complete cycle of use, which starts to generate more life and flowers in the future. The Queen, a fan of gardening, would certainly approve of the plan.

About Abhishek Pratap

Food maven. Unapologetic travel fanatic. MCU's fan. Infuriatingly humble creator. Award-winning pop culture ninja.

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